Opera Singers - G - Page 4

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American bass-baritone Putnam Griswold (1874-1914) studied with Alberto Randegger in London and Jacques Bouhy in Paris. He made his operatic debut (1901) at Covent Garden as Renato in the premiere of Stanford's Much Ado About Nothing. Although he made regular appearances in London, his longest contract was with the Royal Opera in Berlin (1906-1911) where he was considered one of the greatest foreign interpreters of the Wagner bass roles. In 1911 he toured several German cities before sailing to New York to make his Metropolitan Opera debut (23 Nov 1911) as Hagen in Götterdämmerung. He sang in the world premiere of Walter Damrosch's Cyrano de Bergerac (1913). He remained at the Metropolitan for three seasons. His last performance there (8 Feb 1914) was a Wagner concert twenty days before his death. He died during an appendicitis operation. American dramatic soprano Dusolina Giannini (Philadelphia: 19 Oct 1903 [also given as 19 Dec 1902] - Zurich: 29 Jun 1986). Daughter of Italian tenor Ferruccio Giannini (1868-1948) and the pianist Antonietta Briglia-Giannini. She studied with her father and with Marcella Sembrich. Her first performance was in a concert at Carnegie Hall (1923). She made her stage debut at the Hamburg State Opera (1925) as Aida. She appeared at the State Operas in Berlin, Vienna, and Hamburg. She also sang at Covent Garden, the Salzburg Festivals, in Zurich, Monte Carlo, Oslo, Brussels, Amsterdam, San Francisco, and Mexico City. She finally arrived at the Metropolitan Opera in 1936, making her debut there as Aida, and remaining there until 1941. While in the States she sang in San Francisco, Chicago, and with the NY City Opera during their first season (1943, opening night Tosca). After World War II she toured Europe again. Always on the move during her stage career, she finally settled in Zurich where she taught.  
          Jeanne Granier
Grüning
Grüning
Grüning
Griswold
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Gigli
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Gura-Hummel
Giannini
French soprano Jeanne Granier was primarily seen in walk-on parts as a member of the Jacques Offenbach company. When the principal soprano (Louise Theo) in Jolie Parfumeuse fell ill, Granier was the substitute, and in typical fairy tale fashion made a brilliant debut. She was snapped up by composer Charles Lecocq who was at the time the leading producer and composer of operettas. Granier's physical appearance, described as "built on the stocky, generous lines," can almost be supported by the picture seen here. Much to Lecocq's distress, Granier was a classically trained artist. She was recoached by Lecocq specifically in a mold suitable for his operettas. She was an instant success. Many of his operettas might have fallen flat without her popular presence. She created roles in Lecocq's Le petit duc and La cigale et la fourmi, as well as roles in works by Messanger, Hervé, Lacôme, and Planquette. Her popularity lasted nearly twenty years. German tenor Wilhelm Grüning (1858-1942) in Rienzi. He made his debut (1881) in Danzig. He spent most of his career at the Hannover Opera and the Berlin Imperial Opera. At the latter he sang in the unsuccessful world premiere of Der Roland von Berlin. Annie Gura-Hummel: German soprano (Strasbourg, France: 5 Oct 1884 - Hannover-Langenhagen, Germany: 7 Jan 1964) as Santuzza. She was married to baritone Hermann Gura (his third wife). She sang at the Hamburg Opera, making her debut there in 1908 as Macaela in Carmen. She also sang at Covent Garden in London, and in Berlin. Beniamino Gigli (Recanati, Italy: 20 Mar 1890 - Rome:  30 Nov 1957). Italian tenor.
Griswold
Granier
 (31 March 1852 – 18? December 1939)
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