Opera Singers - S - Page 1

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Sammarco
Salvatini
Sanderson
Sanderson
Scheidemantel
Scheff
Santley
Scheidemantel
Scheidemantel
Italian soprano Mafalda Salvatini (1888-?) as Tosca. She studied with Jean de Reszke and Pauline Viardot-Garcia. She was very well liked in Berlin but never sang in her native Italy. Her successes were in part, due to her fine acting abilities. Italian baritone Mario Sammarco (1867-1930) made his debut in Palermo as Valentine in Les Huguenots. In New York he was hired by Hammerstein for his Manhattan Opera Company as a replacement for Maurice Renaud. He soon became the principal baritone for that company. He had a relatively smooth career until he met up with a disapproving Mary Garden in a Chicago Tosca in 1913. She requested that he be replaced, but after he named some of his former distinguished and uncomplaining Tosca partners, notably Emmy Destinn, the performances went on to critical success. American soprano Sybil Sanderson (1865-1903) had quite a remarkable career in such a short lifetime. She studied at the Paris Conservatoire, and privately with Marchesi and Sbriglia. She made her debut at The Hague as Manon under the name of Ada Palmer. Massenet, who was smitten with this young beauty, turned the title roles in Esclarmonde (1889) and Thaïs (1894) over to her. She was equally admired by Saint-Saëns who wrote Phryné for her. Massenet described her as the "ideal Manon" and an "unforgettable Thaïs." Even with her Paris successes she was unable to generate the same kind of frenzied admiration from the Covent Garden (1891) and Metropolitan Opera (1894-5, 1901-2) audiences. Henry Krehbiel of the New York Tribune found her 1895 Metropolitan debut "lacking in volume and in penetrative quality," but approved of her appearance and natural grace on stage. Her reappearance at the Metropolitan Opera during the 1901-02 season was marred by illness. She died of pneumonia at the age of thirty-eight. Sanderson was responsible for launching the career of American soprano Mary Garden.
Sammarco
The great English baritone [Sir] Charles Santley (1834-1922). He made his first major opera appearance (3 Feb 1860) in Wallace's Lurline at Covent Garden. A special air sung by the Faust character, Valentine, "Avant de quitter ces lieux" was created by Gounod for Santley. The effervescent Austrian soprano Fritzi Scheff  (1879-1954) was a successful singer in grand opera but made her real impact in the world of operetta. She made her debut (1897) at the Munich Royal Opera as Marie in Fille du Régiment. In 1906 she was a sensation in Mlle. Modiste in New York, and her operetta career was launched. Unfortunately, her voice only exists today on a fragment of a Mapleson cylinder. She appeared on radio in 1936 to sing Herbert’s “Kiss Me Again,” and her voice was as wonderful ever at the age of 57. One may be able to find this recording on the Internet. Karl Scheidemantel (Weimar: 21 Jan 1859 - Weimar: 26 (21?) Jun 1923): German baritone. Debut Weimar (1878) as Wolfram. Sang mostly in Weimar (1878 - 1886), Bayreuth (1886 - 1892), Munich (1882), Dresden (1886 - 1911), Vienna (1890), La Scala (1892) and London's Covent Garden (1884). Created Urok (Paderewski: Manru), Kunrad (Strauss: Feuersnot), and Faninal (Strauss: Rosenkavalier). Translated two works into German, Don Giovanni and Cosi fan tutte (Dame Kobold).  Danish tenor Erik Schmedes (1868-1931) made his debut (1891) as a baritone in Nuremberg. He sang at the 1899-1906 Bayreuth Festivals, where his heroic tenor voice was particularly suited for Parsifal and Siegfried.
Schmedes
Schmedes
Schmedes
Schmedes
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