Opera Singers - S - Page 2

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Schumann-Heink
Salvatini
Schwarz
Schumann-Heink
Scotti
Scotti
Schwarz
Sevastianov
Sevastianov
Austrian-Hungarian bass-baritone Friedrich Schorr (2 Sep 1888 – 14 Aug 1953). He studied in Vienna and Brno, and made his debut in Graz. He performed in Prague, Cologne, and Berlin. He also appeared at Covent Garden and at the Metropolitan Opera. He was especially admired in Bayreuth, where he performed at the Festivals from 1925 to 1933. He emigrated to the United States in 1931. German soprano Elisabeth Schumann (1885-1952) as Gretel and Frl. Jung as Hänsel in Hänsel und Gretel. Schumann was famous for her concert work, especially for her interpretation of the songs of Richard Strauss who often accompanied her on the piano. In opera she was admired for her diction and elegant coloratura voice. She made fifty-two appearances during her one season (1914-15) at the Metropolitan Opera. Bohemian, later American, contralto Ernestine Schumann-Heink (1861-1936). Her concert debut took place in Graz at the age of fifteen in a performance of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. Only two years later she made her operatic debut as Azucena (Il Trovatore) at the Dresden Royal Opera. In 1926, to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of her singing debut in Graz, she performed to a packed house at Carnegie Hall.
Schumann
Latvian baritone Joseph Schwarz (1880-1926) as Escamillo in Carmen. His first major engagement was at the Vienna Imperial Opera in 1909 where he became particularly popular. His ravishing voice was heard throughout Europe. In the 1920s he joined the Chicago Opera but by this time his voice and health were deteriorating due to alcoholism. Italian baritone Antonio Scotti (1866-1936) was a pupil of Esther Triffani-Paganini. His debut (1889) was as Cinna in Spontini's Vestale. He made his Covent Garden debut in 1899 where he was a tremendous success, but it was later that same year, when he began his thirty-five season association with the Metropolitan Opera, that he found a home. Scotti, often teaming up with Enrico Caruso, made over 1200 appearances at the Metropolitan. He was particularly successful in Tosca as Scarpia which he performed 217 times there. His debut (27 Dec 1899) as Don Giovanni drew the following comments from W.J. Henderson of the New York Times: "He possesses a beautiful barytone voice, fine and smooth in quality. . . . He sings with intelligence and discrimination, and with the accent of dramatic truthfullness." Russian tenor and impresario Vasili Sevastianov. Sergei Levik described Sevastianov's performance as Don José in Act III of Carmen: "Slowly but surely he reached the very edge of fury. Just when your hair stood on end with terror, Sevastianov would release Carmen and, clutching his head and opening his eyes and utter the words, Et la chaine qui nous lie nous liera jusqu'au trépas . . . in such a terrifying voice that, even when released, Carmen didn't dare to move from the spot." German tenor Johannes Sembach [real name Johannes Semfke] (9 Mar 1881-20 Jun 1944) as Radamés in Aida. He studied under Jean de Reszke. He made his grand opera debut (1900) at the Vienna Imperial Opera where he remained for five years. This was followed by eight seasons with the Dresden Royal Opera. He created the role of Aegisthus in the world premiere of Elektra. He made numerous appearances at Covent Garden, the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, and the Metropolitan Opera. In 1925 he settled in Berlin as a singing teacher. He also sang and recorded operetta under his birth name.
Sembach
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