Opera Singers - W - Page 1

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Walker
Walker
Wedekind
Wedekind
Weidt
Weidt
Weidt
White
Weidt
New York born soprano Edyth Walker (1867-1950). She studied with Orgeni in Dresden. Her debut (1894) was a Fidès in Le Prophète at the Berlin Opera. She appeared throughout Europe before making her Metropolitan Opera debut (1903) as Amneris in Aida. After three seasons singing both soprano and mezzo roles, she terminated her contract with that company to pursue European engagements exclusively in soprano roles. She remained unmarried throughout her career, maintaining the view that an artist "should be wedded to her art." German soprano Erika Wedekind (1868-1944) as as Nedda in Pagliacci. She made her stage debut (1894) at the Dresden Royal Opera as Frau Fluth in Nicolai's Lustigen Weiber von Windsor. She was an immediate sensation and remained the celebrated principal coloratura soprano at the Dresden Opera until 1909. At Covent Garden in 1903 she introduced her interpretation of Rosina to the London audiences. She was acclaimed in this role by an enthusiastic critic of The London Times: "[Her] voice is a light soprano, and she is what the Germans call a 'coloratur' singer of rare skill, her execution of scales being almost as perfect as Mme Melba's. She sang 'Una voce' with a profusion of ornament which was almost bewildering. . . ." German soprano Lucie Weidt (1879-1940) was a student of Rosa Papier in Vienna. Her debut was at the Imperial Opera in Vienna as Elisabeth in Tannhäuser. She was Vienna's first Lisa (Queen of Spades), Marschallin (Rosenkavalier), and Kundry (Parsifal), a role she also introduced to the La Scala audiences. She had a large soprano voice with a perfect trill. She appeared all over the world, including a season at the Metropolitan Opera (1910-11).  Massachusetts-born soprano was Carolina White (1883-1961). She made her operatic debut (1908) as Gutrune in Götterdämmerung at the Teatro San Carlo (Naples). She was Minnie in the first performance of La Fanciulla del West at the Chicago Opera. There she sang Maliella in the American premiere of I Gioielli della Madonna. After 1914 she was seen mostly in operettas and concert appearances. In 1918 she appeared with Enrico Caruso in the silent film, My Cousin Caruso. Iowa-born bass-baritone Clarence Whitehill (1871-1932) as Wotan. He made his debut (1898) in Brussels in Gounod's Roméo et Juliette. After several appearances at the Opéra-Comique he traveled to the Cologne Opera (1903-08) and other German houses. He sang in Bayreuth in 1904 with the blessings of Cosima Wagner. He sang quite often at the Chicago Opera and at Covent Garden, but he made the Metropolitan Opera his home singing for nineteen seasons beginning with an appearance as Wolfram in Tannhäuser (15 Nov 1909). Henry Krehbiel of the New York Tribune wrote that Whitehill had "no superior in the field of Wagnerian music drama," calling his Hans Sachs a "warm, human, and poetic creation."
Walker
Willer
Willer
Whitehill
German contralto Luise Willer (1888-1970) as Brängane in Tristan und Isolde, and Magdalena. She made her debut as Annius in Mozart's Clemenza di Tito. In Munich, where she principally appeared, she sang in the world premiere of Palestrina (1917). Evan Williams (1867-1918) was considered one of the most respected American oratorio tenors of his time, as well as being one of the great interpreters of songs. He amassed over a thousand recital appearances during his career. He was originally a steel mill worker whose talents were discovered during an amateur singing competition. In the publication Concert Life in New York, Richard Aldrich wrote: "It is a voice of uncommon charm, of a lyric quality that is rare. . . . It is powerful withal, and he had equally rare qualities of intelligence, imagination, taste and sentiment." 
Williams
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