Opera Singers - Z - Page 1

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Zbruyeva
Zador
Zenatello
Zbruyeva
Ziegler
Zeppilli
Zeppilli
Zottmayr
Zador
Hungarian baritone Desider Zador (1873-1931). His debut (1898) was in Czernowitz as Almaviva. He was associated with many opera houses, among them the Komische and Stadtische Operas in Berlin, Elberfeld, Dresden Court Opera and the Budapest Opera where he also conducted. His voice (as a bass) can be heard on one of the earliest (1908) recordings made of Faust. Contralto Yevgeniya Zbruyeva (186?-1936). Her singing career was naturally prompted by her father, Pyotr Bulakhov, who was a singer and composer. After graduating from the Moscow Conservatory, where she studied with Yelisaveta Lavrovskaya, she joined the Bolshoi in 1893. She was also seen at the Mariinsky Theatre after 1905. She was a possessor of a beautiful voice that was even, deep and rich throughout its range. Her roles were well thought out and she paid particular attention to her diction and the text. She greatest roles were Marfa (Khovanshchina), and Glinka's Vanya and Ratmir. After her retirement from the stage she taught at the conservatory in St. Petersburg. Tenor Karl Ziegler in Der Schmuck der Madonna. Vienna, 1912. Smaller roles in Bayreuth. German bass Georg Zottmayr (1869-1941) as Sarastro, and Gurnemanz in Parsifal. Zottmayr began his career as a concert singer before turning to opera. He appeared mostly in Vienna, Prague, and Dresden. Italian tenor Giovanni Zenatello (1876-1949) as Otello, a role for which he was particularly known. He sang in several important world premieres, most notably as Pinkerton in the original and revised versions of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. This is a Mishkin photograph, circa 1909. French soprano of Italian parents, Alice Zeppilli (Menton, France: 28 Aug 1885 – Pieve di Cento: 14 Sep 1969) had a career that ranged from 1901 to 1930. She was quite popular in the United States where she appeared in Chicago, Philadelphia, and with the Manhattan Opera in New York. She made her debut (Milan: 25 Nov 1901) at the Teatro Lirico as Stella in the world premiere of Orefice's Chopin. She also had successful appearances in Venice and Monte Carlo. She died in Pieve di Cento, Italy, where a theater was named after her. That theater also contains documents and memorabilia associated with Zeppilli. She is seen here as Stella in the world premiere of Chopin.
                        Georg Zottmayr 
  (1869-1949)